Filiz Sarah Gärtner

CODE_n Hall 16 at CeBIT: Smart ideas and high spirits on day two

The second day in CODE_n hall 16 at CeBIT, the international tradefair in Hanover, Germany, started out with an upbeat mood: 50 finalists from all around the globe, partners, politicans and CODE_n alumnis had been celebrating at the pioneer’s dinner the night before, letting the opening day of the exhibition come to a bright and relaxing end. It’s not everday you dine in a specially designed hall – in front of robots – together with good company and there was reason to celebrate, too: antendances at the fair, especially in hall 16, were good; quite a few startups were surprised by the amount of contacts they were able to count even on day one.

dinner

So the positive spirit was brought to day two, which revolves around all of the four CODE_n 15 Internet of Things topics Digital Life, Smart Cities, Future Mobility and Industry 4.0, with an emphasis on the last of the four themes. The conference program, for example, started out with a stage dialog with CODE_n partner Trumpf, Engel Austria and finalists Oden Technologies from the United Kingdom, looking at machine building going cloud. The conclusion, by the way, was that machine building companies seem to be waking up. In the afternoon, Accenture presented the Industry 4.0 topic from a different point of view, tapping the full potential of future manufacturing, iniviting the following speakers on stage: Frank Riemensperger, Senior Managing Director, Accenture DACH, Prof. Dr. Henning Kagermann, President of acatech, Klaus Helmrich, Member of the Board of Siemens AG, Dirk Hoke of CEO Business Unit Large Drives of Siemens AG, Marten Schirge, Head of Sales of Device Insight, Harald Zapp, CEO of relayr.

Get Started by BITKOM brought in Felix Bauer, CEO of aircloak, to talk about the security and privacy in the Internet of Things, Nick Sohnemann, Founder and Managing Director of FUTURECANDY talked about the next technology wave. Marten Schirge, Head of Sales of Device Insight invited his listenors to think big, even if starting small and explained how business can benefit from smart remote services within industry 4.0. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Raising expectations: CODE_n Hall 16 at CeBIT ’15

This morning, doors opened at the world’s largest trade fair for IT & Digital Business: CeBIT 2015 in Hanover. For CODE_n, the week began on Sunday already and it started quite promising: the press conference with the CODE_n partners Trumpf, Accenture, EY and Salesforce was very well-attended; the ROBOCHOP installation got lots of attention even before the doors officially opened. This morning, the last of the CODE_n finalists arrived and adorned their boots. First impression? The next five days are set out to be quite spectacular! Let’s have a look at what is yet to come.

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To start with an overall proposition: Digitization is everywhere, not just in hall 16. During the opening event, China – the partner country of this year’s CeBIT – presented itself as IT-site. Alibaba founder Jack Ma, for example, introduced a system for online payment. The main topics throughout the whole exhibition are Big Data & Cloud, Digital Transformation, IoT, Mobile, Security and Social Business.

GFT as initiator and CODE_n as innovative platform for startups and established corporations have identified where the trend is headed: Going back to hall 16, it can be said that the pivot of the digital avant-garde is here and it’s massively impressive. The 50 finalists, the partners, the hall design itself – it all revolves around one topic: Into the Internet of Things.
More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Finalist | Kumi for health (Germany) – improving health care provision, enabling clinical excellence

Our Industry 4.0 finalist kumi for health developed a web-based, platform-type software delivered to hospital departments as a service. kumi Flow offers a patient-specific innovative link between diseases, corresponding clinical pathways and tools allowing for care-team-interaction. Within kumi Flow’s smart logistics solution, network- based information (e.g. from sensors/ location trackers) will dynamically drive optimization of Health Care professionals proposed workflows and lead to better provision of care. We talked to Dr. Timothy Mende, CEO of kumi for health about his solution.

Fore more information visit: CODE_n CONNECT | Website

Where did your idea for the company come from?

Dr. Timothy Mende (kumi for health): Bad quality of treatment in hospitals and overwhelmed and often frustrated clinicians – both closely linked to insufficient clinical care processes – are problems I experienced daily while working as a physician at a large German university hospital. From there on I was hooked on the idea of making hospitals a safer place for patients and a more rewarding and less cumbersome place for clinical staff. We found our company’s name by looking at our core values: „kumi” means „team” in Japanese – which perfectly fits in with our belief that healthcare provision needs to be teamwork at its very best!

For which kind of audience is your product or service intended and what problem is it solving?

Dr. Timothy Mende (kumi for health): kumi is bringing the digital todo list to where it creates the biggest value: hospitals! Our industry-specific intelligent ‚Wunderlist‘ is to be used by doctors, nurses and further members of clinical teams in the in-patient hospital setting (e.g., a cardiology or orthopedics department). For clinicians we will solve the problem of cumbersome and only partially effective work routines by replacing workflow-related ad-hoc communication and pen & paper todo lists with a smart, engaging and beautiful tool. For patients this approach leads to solving the problem of variant and partly inferior quality of care. Finally, we are helping hospital executives in their struggle to ensure best in class treatment quality and safety while running their hospitals efficiently. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Finalist | Lhings (Spain) – Having a positive impact on people’s lifes through IoT

Lhings quadratOur Digitial Life finalist Lhings from Spain has developed an innovative IoT cloud platform for end-users who can start using its services simply by creating a free account. Therefore, the platform allows people to interact with devices and with them, offer services to others. We talked to Agustin Navarro, CEO of Lhings, about his startup.

Fore more information visit: CODE_n CONNECT | Website | Twitter

Where did your idea for the company come from?

Agustin Navarro (Lhings): The core of our team are researchers who were involved in connectivity for medical laboratories years ago. Having the know-how and expertise, we realized it could be applied to anything with innumerable applications in our everyday life. Our vision, the passion for this idea and also the possibility of providing people with a positive impact on their lives through our technology were enough motivation to start the company.

For which kind of audience is your product or service intended and what problem is it solving?

Agustin Navarro (Lhings): The objective of Lhings is to provide consumers with a tool to enjoy the services and benefits provided by IoT technology, and at the same time provide a tool for service providers, integrators, corporations and even individuals, to render those services. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Finalist | ULU (Netherlands) – Unlocking potential for a better mobility experience

ulu quadratischOur Future Mobility finalist ULU created a a vehicle/driver ecosystem connecting stakeholders around the vehicle with the driver in mind. It provides real time answers to businesses in the ecosystem and connected vehicle experience and feedback to the driver. We talked to Jošt Faganel, CEO of ULU, about his startup and their and solution.

Fore more information on ULU please also visit: CODE_n CONNECT | Website | Twitter

Where did your idea for the company come from?

Jošt Faganel (ULU): The idea for our startup came from the founding team being people who play with data. We believe there is a huge unused or better “unlocked” potential of car and driving related data, that can – at the end of the day – bring a better mobility experience to drivers.

For which kind of audience is your product or service intended and what problem is it solving?

Jošt Faganel (ULU): Ultimately our product targets consumers, but through the business channels of the of the car ecosystem. We enable companies to adopt and leverage the connected car within their businesses, optimizing the cost side of operations and enabling them to offer new connected car services to their customers. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Guest article | Accenture: Germany’s future lies in digital services – Part 1

Accenture Riemensperger

Frank Riemensperger, Chairman of the Board of Accenture Germany & Board Member of BITKOM

Frank Riemensperger presents the results of an Accenture study for our CODE_n blog. These results make one thing clear: The Internet of Things represents a major opportunity for local industries – but customers need to respond quickly. This is being recognized in the leading sectors of German industry.

By 2020, experts predict that the self-driving car will be ready for series production.

The biggest innovation of the modern day? In any case, the self-driving car is a subject everyone is talking about right now. Google recently unveiled its first road-approved test vehicle. And the small single-seater is soon to start its trials in North California too. But it’s not just the American Internet giant that’s working feverishly on the “robot car”. German car firms such as Daimler, BMW and Audi are also currently developing cars that are driven entirely automatically and accurately without the “driver” doing any steering, touching the pedals or even changing gear. Only sensors and ultra-modern information technology provide the driving pleasure. German manufacturers have already completed successful test drives with their prototypes. By 2020, experts predict that the self-driving car will be ready for series production.

This example illustrates four points: First, there are undreamed-of competition situations and the lines between industries are becoming more and more blurred. This is because, secondly, virtually every product is now based on digital technology. Thirdly, the disruptive potential, the innovative strength harbored by new products and business models, is tremendous. And finally fourthly, many German companies are well placed in this race for this enormous trend. However this applies to the most important lead industries in Germany, such as the automotive industry or mechanical and plant engineering.

Most companies in Germany have recognized the signs of digitization

60 percent anticipate “very clear” impacts in their industry, with twelve percent actually regarding these impacts as “disruptive”. Only three percent believe that there will be no impacts. These figures are the results of the study, “The courage to think differently: digitization strategies of the German top 500”, for which Accenture carried out interviews with around 100 high-ranking managers. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Finalist |KIWI.KI (Germany) – Connecting cities by making the physical key obsolte

KIWI is a handsfree access-as-a-service infrastructure for apartment buildings providing efficiency gains for the real estate industry and true convenience for residents. KIWI makes the physical key obsolete and connects cities by connecting every front door. We talked to Dr.-Ing. Christian Bogatu, Managing Director Product, Sales & Marketing of KIWI about his solution.

For more information visit: CODE_n CONNECT Website Twitter

Where did your idea for the company come from?

Christian Bogatu (KIWI.KI): The idea for KIWI actually came from our co-founder Claudia Nagel. Standing in front of her door one day, hands full of shopping and the kids at her side, she was wondering why she still has to use physical keys these days. When she then spotted mail men and garbage collectors with their huge key chains, she realized that a more intelligent solution to deal with all the key hassle could actually be quite successful. That’s how the idea for KIWI was born.

For which kind of audience is your product or service intended and what problem is it solving?

Christian Bogatu (KIWI.KI): KIWI.KI builds a citywide IoT infrastructure based on KIWI – secure, hands-free access-as-a-service for apartment buildings. For our business customers, access is at the core of their daily activities. Package delivery, waste management, and other service providers need to gain entry in order to do their jobs. This necessitates a huge headache of physical key management. With KIWI installed, it’s simple: A single “Ki” opens all authorized doors and management is done centrally and securely. The private residents, on their part, enjoy the safety and convenience of hands-free access with KIWI. But there are even more potential user groups like rescue services or in the field of ambient assisted living. For example, the Berlin fire brigade has already been using KIWI in a pilot project since December 2014. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Finalist | HUDWAY (Latvia) – Ensuring a clear view for drivers, always.

Hudqay quadratHUDWAY is an augmented-reality application for navigation when visibility is reduced to 50-60 meters and overall conditions are dangerous — heavy snow, rain, fog, dusk or darkness. The user puts the smartphone onto a dashboard, close to the windshield, and starts driving. The live visualization of the road created on the smartphone screen is reflected off the windshield, making it a HUD. Ivan Klabukov, Co-founder and CEO of HUDWAY tells us more about the origin of their idea, the rocky road until they came up with the final solution and all the great functionalities it offers now.

More information: CODE_n CONNECT | Website | Facebook | Twitter

Where did your idea for the company come from?

Ivan Klabukov (HUDWAY): The idea, just as it often happens, came from a real need. My brother – the project co-founder – is a professional rally pilot. He once came up to me and asked me to create a mobile app that would display a road line and the vehicle’s position on it — like you see in games. A rally co-pilot could use this info to get their current speed, locate their position and check if they’re lost.

We made a simple app and then had to work out how to display this info on the windshield. This would allow the pilot to see the info too. Moreover, this would support the co-pilot’s instructions, which is important, especially for junior co-pilots. We couldn’t just attach the phone or tablet in front of the pilot — it would reduce his visibility. Plus, you can’t take the pilot’s eye off the road — to imagine how focused the pilot has to be, imagine driving along a narrow, windy forest road at 150 km/h.

Then we thought about projecting the image onto the windshield. We did some research and found some guys in the USA who already manufacture head-up devices with laser projection onto a special film glued onto the windshield. This was a cool solution, but also a very expensive one. We saw no way forward and almost gave it up. More…