Lena Gaede

Can we save the planet through digitalization? Where new digital technologies can improve sustainability

Most of the time, digitalization is the solution to everything, isn’t it? So why shouldn’t it be a solution to the world’s energy problem? But how can digitized processes help to save the planet? Their biggest advantage is helping to a significant reduction in CO2 emissions, while they minimize the need for some resources (i.e. paper) in manufacturing as well as in logistics. The digital transformation of industries can help to avoid an estimated 26 billion metric tons of net CO2 emissions and this only from three industries: electricity, logistics and automotive. So it’s high time we went for it! Since every increase by 1 percent of the global gross domestic product, the world’s carbon emissions rise by an estimated 0.5 percent.

Digital innovations should therefore be taken on account and used against this trend. Because, applied in the right way, digital technology can save lots of energy, even if it sometimes consumes much. Based on some examples, we show you here how easy can it be for a company to save energy and thereby to make the world a whole lot better.

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EnBW

Guest feature – EnBW | EVs and customer experience: a great combination!

At the moment the discussion around electric vehicles is all around the society and has also been picked up by the whole industry.

However, most of the discussion spans around the challenges of charging infrastructure as well as the challenges around battery capacity, charging times for long distance coverage. Therefore I think it is about time to change perspective and think about the customer experience and how EVs will make our life easier.

To start with I believe it is important to agree on what really matters to customers and human beings. As a concept I strongly believe that the single most valuable thing to human beings is time as it is the only thing which is limited and cannot “yet” be extended. Almost all highly successful products launched these days relate to this thesis (think about smartphones, or digital services like Airbnb or Uber).

So let’s look at EVs from that perspective:

The next generation of EVs will come with battery capacities of 150-200 kW/h which is good for more than 500 km.At the same time when we look at statistics we realize that average distance covered per person/day is 46 km and even less so only 12.3 km consecutively per day. The next thing to consider is that next generation of EVs is also preparing for induction based charging.

induction based charging

induction based charging

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Isabel Alexandre

Meet CODE_n finalist LeanCiti

Eran Aloni

Eran Aloni is the CEO of LeanCiti

In line with the vision of a “Smart City,” LeanCiti enables people, municipalities, and communities to share any type of city-related data about resource consumption within a social network. The platform, created by the Israeli startup LeanCiti, uses big data to help cities and its residents make informed decisions, plan ahead, and use resources optimally. It is applicable in a variety of scenarios, from renewable energy production to water consumption, the reading of smart meters, or the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions. 

The startup was one of the CODE_n14 finalists and had the opportunity to present its project during the five days of CeBIT. In today’s interview, we talk to Eran Aloni, CEO of LeanCiti, about smart cities, their big data solutions, and how they experienced the time spent in the CODE_n hall during CeBIT.

Could you briefly explain how the smart resources platform LeanCiti works?

LeanCiti collects data from smart meters and smart devices that monitor energy consumption and production in smart city environments. We use social networks to change consumption behavior and study patterns, and also allow consumers, producers, and cities to share, compare, and define goals.

How do you encourage usage and get people involved with the platform?

Social engagement, environmental awareness, and gamification.

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Isabel Alexandre

Meet CODE_n finalist AutoGrid System

AutoGrid System is based in Silicon Valley, more precisely, in Redwood City, California. The American startup organizes the vast and growing amount of energy data produced from an increasingly networked and automated grid. With deployments of smart meters, distributed generation, and other grid sensing technologies reaching critical mass, the electricity supply chain now has to deal with greater data volumes than ever before. And AutoGrid is here to work on this problem, improving the production and consumption of electricity.

Amit Narayan, founder and CEO of the startup, explains to us a bit more about how the company connects big data and the energy industry. He also talks about their experience at CODE_n during CeBIT.

Amit Narayan

Amit Narayan, founder and CEO of AutoGrid System

How does AutoGrid use big data, predictive analytics, and cloud computing to optimize the electrical grid?

Autogrid organizes the world’s energy data using Internet-scale, secure cloud computing to process the petabytes of information produced in an increasingly networked and automated grid. AutoGrid employs big data analytics to generate real-time predictions and implement programs for electricity generators, providers, grid operators, and their customers to optimize the use of assets across the grid and manage costs through a comprehensive Energy Data Platform (EDP)™

Apps built upon EDP™ are powered by forecasting and optimization engines, managing functions such as:

  • End-to-end Demand Response with our Demand Response Optimization & Management System (DROMS)
  • Home Energy Management through our customer portal, which Schneider is white-labeling as their Wiser product
  • Peak Charge Management for facilities with Energy Cost Optimizer (ECO), an app co-developed with NTT DATA

Who can use AutoGrid’s platform and how?

Anyone along the electricity value chain can use AutoGrid’s platform and apps, including utility companies, power retailers, ESCOs, facilities, and customers. Apps on the Electricity Data Platform (EDP) are Web-based. Users can subscribe via a Software as a Service (SaaS) model. Additionally, resellers can license the technology. Silver Spring Networks is reselling our DROMS app as their own product, as “Demand Optimizer” within their Utility IQ suite.

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