Lena Gaede

Digital transformation and customer experience – how data mining and big data analytics improve customer understanding

The customer is king and the king wishes new services nowadays. Induced by digitalization he has changed his expectations on services and products. While the customer can access product information and purchase easily mobile – whenever and wherever he wants – the competition between companies grows stronger. Thus, the most effective way to distinguish yourself from competitors remains the customer experience: it already drives two thirds of the decisions customers make, according to an insight by McKinsey. The motto is: provide a great customer experience – or you may lose your customer. And as usual, technology is your friend! Read on to find out how digital transformation and data analytics help to improve the customer experience.

More…

Lena Gaede

Main factors why startups fail and why some succeed! Plus: important dos & don’ts for startup founders

What keeps all startup founders up at night? Knowing that nearly every second startup fails within three years. Then again, what gets them out of bed in the morning is to find out what makes them succeed! It is hard to predict, if a new business will thrive or sink, and you can’t tell by cold numbers. But there must be that certain something for some startups like Uber, Facebook or Airbnb do skyrocket. What are the success factors and the dos and don’ts for founders? Let’s find out!

blog_header

More…

Janina Benz

Viewsy wins CODE_n14 award

Since Monday, 50 startups from 17 countries have been presenting their innovative business models related to the topic of Big Data in the CODE_n hall 16 at CeBIT. The CODE_n jury has reached a decision: The coveted CODE_n award and prize money in the amount of EUR 30,000 were awarded to London-based Viewsy.

CODE_n14_Award_Ceremony

What does Viewsy do?

The UK startup offers retailers the possibility of understanding the behavior of their customers in detail. How much time do they spend on average in the store? Which areas do they frequent the most? How frequently do they visit the store? Viewsy’s technology acquires a variety of different data sources, such as distances walked, interprets them using statistical methods, and thus offers understanding of the behavioral patterns of customers. Brand owners can benefit from this as well by obtaining exact insights into where to best position which products in the store. Conclusions regarding the identity of individuals are purposefully excluded by Viewsy. All data is acquired anonymously. If a customer does not want to be analyzed while shopping, he can simply switch off the WLAN connection of his smartphone. More…

Isabel Alexandre

Meet CODE_n finalist Viewsy

Viewsy provides analytics for offline retailers by supplying insights about customer behavior patterns, such as customer loyalty and time spent in the shop. The British location analytics startup comes to solve a common problem faced by retailers: understanding customer behavior in physical space in order to manage businesses better.

Odera Ume-Ezeoke

Odera Ume-Ezeoke, founder and CEO of Viewsy

The startup, founded in 2011, is rapidly growing and already counts clients like Vodafone and ABN AMRO bank. In today’s interview, we talk to Odera Ume-Ezeoke, founder and CEO of Viewsy, about how they use Big Data to help companies effectively manage physical environments.

The first thing we read on Viewsy website is: “Measure and Manage foot traffic like never before”. Could you briefly explain how it works?

We install discrete passive sensors in store to analyze visitor movements within and between the client’s stores. This data is anonymized and then securely transmitted to Viewsy’s analytics platform, which calculates store statistics on footfall, store visitor flow, and other key metrics. The resulting analysis and data is made accessible via the Viewsy dashboard and reporting suite.

Does this technology also benefit consumers?

Absolutely – our technology has a wide range of applications, including many that have a direct benefit to customers, such as improving store layouts to avoid overcrowding, reducing checkout queue wait times, understanding surge footfall to increase safety (such as in a large arena or football stadium), and enabling better positioning of customer service or security staff. We also offer retailers the ability to provide an option for customers to opt-in and receive special offers and discounts.

How do you think physical shops of the future will be?

When I visualize the retail store of the future, I see a cross between Amazon, Argos, and Apple – A wide open retail showroom space with a very human approach to product education and support, served by an enormous, wholly-automated stockroom that can fulfil purchases within a couple of minutes. In this vision, the relationship between customers and the brands has the same directness that we are starting to see develop with virtual shops, with customers able to use their smartphones to interact with areas of the physical store to leave feedback, receive product recommendations and offers, and conduct product research.

More…

Janina Benz

Building the foundation for Big Data – Security, Part 1

As we’ve seen from the Edward Snowden incident and subsequent revelations by the US National Security Agency, as well as seemingly ever-larger and more complex data breaches in the private sector, one of the biggest challenges in the world of big data is finding an appropriate balance between security and privacy. Ever more data is being stored about all of us, and the bigger, more expansive, and more dynamic the data store, the greater the challenge in affording adequate protection to both individuals and data-holders.

Digital universe

CERN is challenging the limits of big data storage systems as they generate a petabyte of information every second in the quest to discover the origins of the universe. The organisation, in conjunction with the European Commission, established a Grid computing system that taps into computing power from data centres in 11 different countries in order to be able to store even a fraction of the data being collected. More…