Lena Gaede

Digital transformation and customer experience – how data mining and big data analytics improve customer understanding

The customer is king and the king wishes new services nowadays. Induced by digitalization he has changed his expectations on services and products. While the customer can access product information and purchase easily mobile – whenever and wherever he wants – the competition between companies grows stronger. Thus, the most effective way to distinguish yourself from competitors remains the customer experience: it already drives two thirds of the decisions customers make, according to an insight by McKinsey. The motto is: provide a great customer experience – or you may lose your customer. And as usual, technology is your friend! Read on to find out how digital transformation and data analytics help to improve the customer experience.

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Lena Gaede

Digital Darwinism: why companies must step up to digital transformation to survive

We witness a mass extinction. Only the ones who adapt to their environment will survive. No, we are not talking about birds on the Galapagos Islands – we are talking about companies everywhere! The laws of nature equally apply to the business world: digitalization rapidly changes technology and society and forces companies to adapt fast enough – or die. Corresponding to Darwin’s principle of natural selection, we call this phenomenon Digital Darwinism.

Digital Darwinism is a threat for the “business as usual”. In fact, only 71 companies remain today from the original 1955 Fortune 500 list. The one thing that the failed companies have in common: a missing or miscarried digital strategy. No threat, you say, as most modern companies already went digital? So far so good, but the crux of the matter is the very fast pace of digital change: it is not some innovation now and then that companies need to react to. It is digital disruption that completely revolutionizes business models and consumer expectations – and it won’t end. It is possible because technology is now approachable by anyone with an idea to do something different or better. This constant innovation leads to disruption: everything can change and everything is changing. More…

EnBW

Facing up to the Energiewende 2.0 with partners from Baden-Württemberg

As a result of the phasing out of nuclear energy and the associated expansion of renewable energies, German energy supply companies are faced with a multitude of challenges particularly in their core areas of generation/trading, sales and the grids business.

This development has been accompanied by the complex fragmentation of the market and an increased demand from customers for individual solutions and above all for technical developments such as highly scalable, intelligent IT platforms. However, this has now all resulted in a further transformation of the energy world – an “Energiewende 2.0” which is being ushered in on a new digital level. This has caused the energy world to become blurred with other sectors. New competitors, especially those with a high level of IT expertise, are forcing their way onto the existing market. At the same time, the Internet of things, new forms of mobility concepts or the vision of an intelligent, networked city are opening up a great deal of potential for the creation of new business models both for them and also for us as a traditional energy supplier.

Inside of the EnBW Innovation Campus

Inside of the EnBW Innovation Campus

New business models outside of linear developments

In order to successfully position ourselves against the competition in this agile, fast-paced and innovative environment, we have been supporting internal startups within the Group to establish new business models on the market outside of the existing Group structures for the last two and a half years. At our own Innovation Campus founded in Karlsruhe for this purpose, seven teams are now concentrating on the following themes: “Virtual Power Plant”, “Smart City”, “Connected Home” and “Future Mobility”. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

CODE_n Hall 16 at CeBIT: Smart ideas and high spirits on day two

The second day in CODE_n hall 16 at CeBIT, the international tradefair in Hanover, Germany, started out with an upbeat mood: 50 finalists from all around the globe, partners, politicans and CODE_n alumnis had been celebrating at the pioneer’s dinner the night before, letting the opening day of the exhibition come to a bright and relaxing end. It’s not everday you dine in a specially designed hall – in front of robots – together with good company and there was reason to celebrate, too: antendances at the fair, especially in hall 16, were good; quite a few startups were surprised by the amount of contacts they were able to count even on day one.

dinner

So the positive spirit was brought to day two, which revolves around all of the four CODE_n 15 Internet of Things topics Digital Life, Smart Cities, Future Mobility and Industry 4.0, with an emphasis on the last of the four themes. The conference program, for example, started out with a stage dialog with CODE_n partner Trumpf, Engel Austria and finalists Oden Technologies from the United Kingdom, looking at machine building going cloud. The conclusion, by the way, was that machine building companies seem to be waking up. In the afternoon, Accenture presented the Industry 4.0 topic from a different point of view, tapping the full potential of future manufacturing, iniviting the following speakers on stage: Frank Riemensperger, Senior Managing Director, Accenture DACH, Prof. Dr. Henning Kagermann, President of acatech, Klaus Helmrich, Member of the Board of Siemens AG, Dirk Hoke of CEO Business Unit Large Drives of Siemens AG, Marten Schirge, Head of Sales of Device Insight, Harald Zapp, CEO of relayr.

Get Started by BITKOM brought in Felix Bauer, CEO of aircloak, to talk about the security and privacy in the Internet of Things, Nick Sohnemann, Founder and Managing Director of FUTURECANDY talked about the next technology wave. Marten Schirge, Head of Sales of Device Insight invited his listenors to think big, even if starting small and explained how business can benefit from smart remote services within industry 4.0. More…

Filiz Sarah Gärtner

Raising expectations: CODE_n Hall 16 at CeBIT ’15

This morning, doors opened at the world’s largest trade fair for IT & Digital Business: CeBIT 2015 in Hanover. For CODE_n, the week began on Sunday already and it started quite promising: the press conference with the CODE_n partners Trumpf, Accenture, EY and Salesforce was very well-attended; the ROBOCHOP installation got lots of attention even before the doors officially opened. This morning, the last of the CODE_n finalists arrived and adorned their boots. First impression? The next five days are set out to be quite spectacular! Let’s have a look at what is yet to come.

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To start with an overall proposition: Digitization is everywhere, not just in hall 16. During the opening event, China – the partner country of this year’s CeBIT – presented itself as IT-site. Alibaba founder Jack Ma, for example, introduced a system for online payment. The main topics throughout the whole exhibition are Big Data & Cloud, Digital Transformation, IoT, Mobile, Security and Social Business.

GFT as initiator and CODE_n as innovative platform for startups and established corporations have identified where the trend is headed: Going back to hall 16, it can be said that the pivot of the digital avant-garde is here and it’s massively impressive. The 50 finalists, the partners, the hall design itself – it all revolves around one topic: Into the Internet of Things.
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Thibaut Loilier

Software – building the foundation for Big Data Success

Thibaut Loilier is in charge of Market Research for GFT. As author for CODE_n he shares his knowledge of the start-up industry & technology trends.

Thibaut Loilier is in charge of Market Research for GFT. As author for CODE_n he shares his knowledge of the start-up business his time in Silicon Valley.

Thibaut Loilier is in charge of Market Research for GFT, member of the innovation team and author of GFT public whitepapers (Open Innovation, Mobile BankingMobile Payment and IT Trends). Before joining GFT, he worked as Business Strategy Analyst for BNP Paribas in San Francisco with responsibility for strategic analysis and relationship with Silicon Valley’s technology and innovation ecosystems (start-ups, academics, clusters…). He brings his experience within and knowledge of the start-up industry & ecosystem to the CODE_n initiative.

In the first post of this series “Building the Foundations for Big Data Success”, we introduced several companies that are addressing different software challenges posed by the world of big data, companies like  Cloudera, Domo, Data Gravity, and Sqrrll. These companies are, of course, just the tip of the iceberg – the number of start-ups entering the big data marketplace is growing every day.

If you’ve been researching big data players, you may have come across the Big Data Startups Blog. On December 9th, the site published an eye-opening infographic showing the massive scale of investments being made by the new dedicated big-data VC funds in big data start-ups and the huge sums of money changing hands in big data IPOs and acquisitions. More…

Mark van Rijmenam

How To Develop A Big Data Strategy To Outperform Your Competitors

Mark van Rijmenam is founder of the BigData-Startups.com and guest blogger for CODE_n

Mark van Rijmenam is founder of the BigData-Startups.com and guest blogger for CODE_n

A Big Data study from 2013 by Tata Consulting Services showed that 47% of the 1217 firms surveyed had not yet undertaken a Big Data initiative. A similar research project by the SAS Institute in 2013 revealed that 21% of the 339 companies questioned did not know enough about Big Data and 15% of the organisations did not understand the benefits of Big Data. Several other surveys show more or less the same picture. Many organisations have no idea what Big Data is, even though all those brontobytes heading our way will change the way organisations operate and are managed. Big Data offers a lot of opportunities for organisations. An IBM 2010 Global CFO Study indicated that companies leveraging Big Data would financially outperform their competitors by 20% or more, and McKinsey reported a potential increase of 60% in operating margins with Big Data.

Although many organisations do not yet understand Big Data, it is pouring into all organisations from almost every angle imaginable. Every day, small and medium-sized enterprises can easily collect terabytes of data, while startups can effortlessly reach gigabytes and large multinationals can even generate petabytes without any problem. However, simply having massive amounts of data is not enough to become an information-centric organisation that stays ahead of its competition.

Big Data Strategy - McKinsey reported a potential increase of 60% in operating margins with Big Data

Big Data Strategy – McKinsey reported a potential increase of 60% in operating margins with Big Data

Note that I deliberately do not call these organisations data-driven organisations, but rather information-centric. The difference might seem subtle, but in fact the two terms are very different. Data, after all, is useless without the right tools at hand and the right culture in place. Only when data is transformed into information can it become valuable for an organisation. Information-centric companies have a culture that relies on data that is stored, analysed, and visualized, and in which the results form an integral part of the company’s strategic decision-making. More…

Ignasi Barri

Infrastructure – Building the Foundations for Big Data Success

Dr. Ignasi Barri is an expert in innovation management in the technology surrounding and shares his experience on the CODE_n blog

Dr. Ignasi Barri is an expert in innovation management in the technology surrounding and shares his experience on the CODE_n blog

Dr. Ignasi Barri is member of Applied Technologies in GFT Company. His fascination for technology and business helps him in his main goal: empowering innovation in the whole company. Innovation and business experience are combining perfectly to help him in being an author for the CODE_n organization. 

As we noted in our first Big Data post, careful planning is key for the successful creation of a big data-ready infrastructure. Big data requires more than a change in mindset – it requires a change in the technologies used to deal with the different types of data in play and the way they need to be handled to maximize the benefits.

Organizations must analyze what data they have and how they want to use that data in order to match back-end infrastructure needs to application requirements; simply looking at the data and the infrastructure as if they exist in separate silos will not provide an appropriate solution.

Five key elements must be addressed to develop an appropriate strategy that takes all aspects of big data use and optimization into account: More…